MONGOLIA: NEVER JUDGE A GER BY ITS COVER

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The nomadic herders of Mongolia, the vast majority of the population, live in gers (tents) that are moved to various altitudes and climactic locations to optimize the grazing opportunities for their herds of cattle, goats, sheep and horses. The exterior color of a ger is a dull canvas and often the surrounding area is a monotone that doesn’t excite the eye. As winters are incredibly severe – sometimes minus 55 degrees Fahrenheit – the interiors are raging with color to lift the spirits of families.

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This explosion of color in the interior of a ger is common. It more than makes up up for any drab weather conditions outside.
In the image below note the horse saddle hung on the wall and how colorful it is. All of the family shares this space.

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This is the bed of the mother and father who can draw curtains for privacy but you can imagine they must suffer from cabin fever from the extended winters. All the sewing and embroidery seen is made by women in the cold months.

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MONGOLIA: A NOMADIC PEOPLE SURROUNDED BY DRAMATIC SKYSCAPES

Mongolia: Sheep-Horses-River

Mongolia has extreme contrasts of topography and weather and remains a model for pristine preservation of nature. They’re a nomadic cuntry that drives their sheep and goats into the mountains or the valley, depending on which location has the best grazing.

Mongolia: Woman and Lamb

This woman on the edge of the Gobi Deset scans the horizon looking for the herd of sheep that her son is herding home at sunset.

Mongolia: Two Yaks

Yaks are an exotic sight for us but families raise them for their milk and fur.

Mongolia: Children Milking Goats

Goats and sheep are tethered together at night so if a maurading wolf stalks them, the collective yowls from the potential victims wake the owner who fires his shotgun into the air. Here are the family children milking their goats.